Friday, August 10, 2018

All the Frills: Anne Boleyn

This is a little game I like to call “how many pictures of Anne Boleyn can one person have in their house?” Turns out a lot. Which is actually a bit of an accomplishment, considering how few decent portraits of my favourite of Henry VIII’s there actually are.




Weekend Reading:

  • My helpmeet and I never debated the issue of me taking his last name when we married (it was always understood I would keep mine and there would be no hyphenating, also was publishing articles and one day a book under my last name and didn’t want to abandon it) but we definitely talked a lot about Eleanor’s last name. His preference was for us to hyphenate it (but I put my foot down because eventually that ends up, a few generations down the line, in too much hyphenating for anyone’s good)). I personally wanted to make the statement of giving her my last name. It was important to me, both as a feminist gesture and because I’m the last person in my family with my name and it dies with me unless I pass it on (whereas my husband has two brothers), and because, let’s get real, I did the heavy lifting in pregnancy and birth. It meant a lot to me that give her my name. All that is a long-winded way of saying this article resonates with me, and is both very interesting and very frustrating.
  • The wildfire in Greece is so tragic.
  • I LOVE this artist’s work.
  • This opinion piece is brilliant. Why can’t we start judging mothers less? Seriously, it’s something I think a lot about.
  • I’m so excited for the new American Horror Story!

5 comments:

Cee said...

That first article, and your perspective on giving Eleanor your last name, are so interesting to me. I never gave a single thought to changing my name when I got married - my husband didn't care, but my in-laws remain dismayed, which I will never understand. The part of it that is particularly funny is that I was much more of a grown-up person when we first moved in together, so for years (and still), the vast majority of our accounts were in my name. Ian often gets called Mr. Fardoe at the grocery store and by service providers. We just chuckle about it, because really, who cares? We were individuals with our own names before we were married and remain individuals after, whatever anyone calls us... but I know not all men would take being called the wrong name with the same good humour that Ian does.
xox,
Cee

Closet Fashionista said...

I'm currently deciding what to do about my last name. I want to change it because of the tradition and it's whats done. But I also love my own identity and my last name. Just feels so weird to change it! Especially since I never expected to get married, haha! But if we ever had kids I would have the same issue.
http://www.closet-fashionista.com

Lyddiegal said...

I think that is wonderful that Eleanor has your last name. When I thought that marriage was in my future, I was pretty resolute that I would not change my name. While I do like the idea of having a unified family name, it seems awful to give up part of my identity to do so. (not to mention the headache of having to change my name in 800 million places.)
Chic on the Cheap

JennaStevie said...

That's definitely an interesting article, I won't change my last name, but having kids definitely brings up questions of whose last name will they get/hyphenated etc. I said we should combine ours, only because it sounded funny. I love that she got your last name, so awesome!!
The fires in Greece are so awful, we traveled all around there years ago and its crazy to see that.
I truly do not understand why mothers are so harshly judged, it's awful hearing some of it. We all need to give each other a break!
Jenna

Lorena said...

In Latin America its even worst as when you marry not only is the man's name added to yours BUT the word "de" is included. Meaning you'd be Courtney DE yourhusband'slastname. "DE" meaning belongs to. I kept my last name.
However here the tradition is the children have both last names.
I think Brasil and Portugal are the ones that have children bear the mom and then the father's last name.